Sport 

view all

 Entertainment 

view all

BhuQaid's passport to happiness

BhuQaid Shevanna offers you a passport to happiness with his new album, 'Passengers and Passports'

• Pinehas Nakaziko

THE Ongwediva-based musician BhuQaid Shevanna continues to make his mark in the industry, and has now added the album 'Passengers and Passports' to his name.


From The Twittersphere

@ambernoelle: I hate to tell you this but I think 2021 is three 2020s in a trench coat.

TWEEPS get down with an array of issues, from Covid to winter to ghosts and bras. In no particular order. Nonetheless, Covid remains the order of the day…



 Business 

view all

Poll

View older polls

    Results so far:

      Why Are Blow Jobs Exciting Namibians?

      A LAW promoting the culture of white people, another about taking land from 'natives' and one that blatantly stifles political protests are among 34 colonial-era laws targeted for removal from Namibia's legal system.

      How mind-boggling it is then that sizeable numbers of Namibians are expending copious amounts of energy on homosexuality, which is not even among the 34 laws that clearly are out of touch with the Namibian Constitution.

      The piece that gave rise to the emotive discussion on homosexuality is the government's move to scrap laws on so-called sodomy, a relic from the Bible's (Old Testament) tale of Sodom and Gomorrah.

      That leaves 33 other laws which apparently many people are not bothered by, despite the fact they remain on Namibia's statute books.

      Are Namibians waiting until some despotic-minded politicians try to use the discriminatory laws before appreciating the importance of bringing our statutes in line with the letter and spirit of the Constitution?

      While many of these laws may not be publicly quoted, some policy administrators continue to base their actions on them.

      The government surely cannot be wrong in taking action to remove laws that enforced apartheid. Some are simply no longer of use, while several others will simply not pass the constitutionality test.

      The one sodomy and unnatural offences law is among 144 laws that have been looked at since 2013 as no longer useful – either because they are impossible to enforce in a pro-human rights environment, or that we all have come to agree that the promotion of one race above another is repugnant.

      To date it appears only 38 of the 144 laws brought to the attention of parliament in 2018 have been scrapped.

      Among legislation announced for removal last week are the Criminal Law Amendment Act of 1953, the Crown Land Disposal Proclamation of 1920, the Cultural Promotion Ordinance of 1980, the Natives Minimum Wage Proclamation of 1944, and the so-called Protection of Fundamental Rights Act of 1988.

      The Protection of Fundamental Rights Act of 1988 was enacted after student protests got too hot for the apartheid regime.

      It remains in force although the Namibia National Students' Organisation and its secretary general at the time, Ignatius Shixwameni, together with an array of trade unions, tried to have it scrapped.

      The Cultural Promotion Ordinance of 1980 blatantly provides for the promotion of the culture of the “white population group in South West Africa”.

      The Natives Minimum Wage Proclamation of 1944 was a colonial attempt to pacify opposition to the contract labour system that enslaved blacks to work for whites by providing for a minimum wage of those forced into contract labour.

      It was never accepted by the colonial employers, but remains a law of independent Namibia.

      The part that got everyone excited is the common law offences of sodomy and unnatural acts.

      “Sodomy was previously considered to comprise a number of 'unnatural' sexual acts, which included masturbation, sexual intercourse with animals, heterosexual intercourse between Christians and Jews, oral sex and anal intercourse between people of the same or opposite sexes,” according to the report of the Law Reform and Development Commission.

      Sodomy is seemingly being confused with homosexuality, hence the heated debates that the government is purportedly legalising same-sex relationships.

      The government is simply acknowledging that such a law is discriminatory as it does not apply to everyone equally.

      Besides, who is to regulate sexual affairs between consenting adults and even stop them from having a blow job or masturbating?

      Another issue that deserves urgent attention is how many lives are destroyed in traditional courts when people are accused of witchcraft and have their property removed while they themselves are ripped away from their families and communities and banished.

      Surely Namibians have more important challenges to solve than wasting their time and energy on trying to block logical and progressive actions.

      These and other issues deserve our best efforts, not who is sleeping with who.


      Today's ePaper [click to subscribe]


      Most Viewed Articles


      Editorials



      Video

      view all

      Cartoons