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IT SEEMS the moody overcast weather has whet some Namibians appetite for a fight. A hectic version of 'Food Wars' has broken out on Twitter TLs pitting oshifima lovers against macaroni stans; carb vs carb. At the time of going to press, no briefs from the frontline were available. So, for now, this, that and the other from the sidelines…



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      Namdia revenue up 120% amid Covid-19

      by Charmaine Ngatjiheue

      Namib Desert Diamonds (Namdia) chief executive officer Kennedy Hamutenya

      THE Namibian diamond industry has shown resilience amid the ravaging Covid-19 pandemic with an increase in revenue flows of 120%.

      Namib Desert Diamonds (Namdia) chief executive officer Kennedy Hamutenya this week said, “We were smiling all the way to the bank, while others where on their knees.”

      Hamutenya said the diamond industry in Namibia has managed to garner goodwill from the international market, making it easy to sell diamonds without being physically present at the diamond auction floors.

      “When Covid-19 hit us, we went for three months without selling a single stone. It was very difficult for us for a number of reasons – clients couldn't come in, logistical lockdowns, and people were scared to travel. After three months, we found a working formula, where clients said they know that Namibian diamonds are beautiful, they know our quality and they trust us, hence, they suggested we put our diamonds in a box and deliver them,” he said.

      Hamutenya said the country leveraged on the trust the world had in Namibian diamonds to sell their diamonds remotely during the peak of the pandemic.

      Speaking to Desert Radio this week, the Namdia CEO said the company has continued to grow its operations over the past five years, despite the Covid-19 challenges that hit two years ago.

      “It is amazing, but I do not know whether it is innovation, luck or both. That's what happened, until today, I am telling you we had our best sales ever. This is our record-breaking year. We broke our record by more than 120%,” he said.

      He explained that Namdia learnt to build trust with their clients over time, hence, clients would pay and have their product sent to them. He reiterated that Namdia is one of the luckiest businesses in the world and is making money.

      “We are laughing our way to the bank,” Hamutenya said.

      Moreover, he added that their company has been operational for five years now, and like any other company, Namdia wants to grow and that means revising the company's strategic plan.

      Hamutenya added that revising the plan has to look at the structure, the staff complement and so forth.

      “Namdia is an evolving company, we want to move to the next level and we want to be the best diamond company in the whole world. That is where we are moving,” he stated.

      He added that the Namdia board would approve the new five-year plan on 17 January. Moreover, Namdia is restructuring, which would mirror the strategic plan.

      “We want to be three times bigger than we are. We want to look at our structure to see whether we have the right people in the right place. We want to be the biggest in the world, we want to be everywhere in Milan, in [to] Dubai, in New York. When people go in the shop, they must know Namdia,” he said.

      Hamutenya also allayed fears that the Namibian industry will be affected by the rise of synthetic diamonds in the world.

      “We do not produce synthetic diamonds in Namibia and we are focused on raw diamonds. We are doing very well because the diamond industry is driven by love and sentimental value,” he said.


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